Home yoga practice: it’s the simple things that matter

“Just do it” doesn’t  usually work when it comes to the home practice of yoga. Chances are, if you have an established home practice, you are “just doing it” and not spending time wondering how to get there, and what gets you to the mat every morning (or evening or lunch or saturday or whatever) isn’t some grunting force of will, but a draw born of experience: the experience of how you feel when you’re there, how you feel on days when you get there, how you felt that day when you didn’t.

 

English: All Solutions By Yogi Tamby Chuckrava...

You don’t have to look like this guy to do yoga at home. Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

If you’re wondering how to start – or start again, though, white knuckling it could undermine the very reason you’re planning to do yoga at all. Try these actions instead and find out how good life is when you yoga on your own:

  • If you’re practicing in the morning, bring  your morning cuppa into the yoga space with you. Whether it’s water, coffee, tea or vodka (just kidding, really… yoga before drinking) sometimes this can create a nice transition. Instead of having to finish your current routine before you roll out the mat, use your current routine to find comfort with the one you’re creating. You can sit and take a sip or two of hot morning yumminess while on your mat and absorb the loveliness of your new practice. 
  • Choose a simple signal to begin and end your practice. Whether you have a fancy bell to ring or start the same music every time, simply having a repetitive action that you associate only with coming to your mat can be powerfully settling. I have come to look forward to ringing the lovely bell of compassion my MIL sent for Christmas at the start and end of practice. It sends a wave of “Okay, you’re here now, until this bell rings again” and allows me to sink in to simply doing the next thing, and the next thing, and the next thing and letting that be fresh  and new and not pre-planned.
  • Plan the beginning and end of each practice. This creates a container of sorts and can free you up in between. I begin sitting in vajrasana with breath observation (also how I begin all classes) and end with a selected sequence of finishing poses (as a recovering Ashtanga Yogi there are a few things I’m incapable of doing without). You can begin in  Mountain Pose and end with Bridge before Corpse Pose   If you know what you’re going to begin and end with, you may find it easier to let go.
  • Use a template. There’s no reason you can’t plan or have your practice planned for you. Wondering “what am I supposed to do???” or “what should I do next???” or whether you’ll remember that great pose from class can all trigger a massive round of monkey bars for the mind and before you know it you’re a stress ball instead of a bliss monkey. Choose three to five poses you want to focus on and write the names or draw stick figures out before hand. A note from yourself, to yourself. If you want examples, I posted some early versions on this blog, and if you want help just leave a comment. This is one of my favorite things :)

Leave me a comment below with your favorite tip for making it to the mat or letting me know how these tips work for you! Home practice is my passion and I’d love to know about yours. Namaste.

 

 

 

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7 thoughts on “Home yoga practice: it’s the simple things that matter

  1. I love the idea of taking my cuppa into my yoga room :). You are spot on, if you have an established yoga practice, it will be the joy of the practice that draws you in…but I found, having completed a 40 day home yoga practice (through Kara-Leah Grant’s 40 days of yoga), that at the beginning it is very helpful to establish the reasons why you want a practice, and to make a commitment (a public one is helpful). I found the reasons why I thought I didn’t practice yoga regularly were all wrong. Very enlightening :)

  2. Love it!!!! I don’t take my cuppa on the mat with me, but I do sip sip sip a bit before (and, most importantly, afterwards.) I use the yoga timer app so that I can time my practice and not worry about “how long should I be in savasana for? or have I done the 20/30/60 whatever time I’ve chosen for the day length of practice!

  3. Love this!! I found it because it popped up as a trackback on my own blog. I would love for you to share it with our readers at elephant journal if you are willing & interested. Yours, Kate (kate@elephantjournal.com)

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