Safe Place Meditation for Relaxation

Today’s Meditation is a gift from our guest, Tracy Weber of Whole Life Yoga in Seattle, Washington. Thank you for this relaxing interval, Tracy!

……………..

One of my favorite meditations allows me to transport myself to a place I love. Sometimes I imagine sitting in front of a roaring fire. Sometimes I walk along the ocean. Sometimes I feel the rough surface of a dock I used to frequent over twenty years ago. Our bodies respond similarly whether we actually visit our favorite locations or simply imagine ourselves there.

The next time you need a vacation, there’s no need to wait save up money or accumulate vacation hours. Try this simple visualization meditation instead. The more senses you involve, the more deeply you will immerse yourself in the experience.

Safe Place Visualization Meditation

1.      Sit comfortably, with your spine erect and the crown of your head floating up to the ceiling. Sitting either in a chair or on the floor is fine, as long as you are physically comfortable and your spine is in “neutral.”

2.      Allow your eyes to close and your focus to go internal.

3.      Notice your breath—without intentionally trying to change it. Feel the warmth and coolness of the breath at the tip of your nostrils. Allow your mind to focus on and pay attention to this feeling of the breath. The breath will be your anchor.

4.      Bring to mind a place in which you feel calm and at peace. It can be a real place you have actually been, or it can be a place created by your imagination. Any place will work as long as it feels serene and safe to you.

  • A cabin next to a crackling fire
  • A forest
  • An ocean beach
  • Cuddling in your living room with your dog, cat, or favorite human.

5.      Imagine yourself in your peaceful place using all of your senses.

  • What do you see? The blues of the sky? The multiple colors of a rainbow? Froth from the ocean waves? Fields of purple or yellow flowers?
  • What do you smell? Freshly mown grass? The brackish smell of the ocean? Vanilla candles? The delicious aroma of baked cookies?
  • What do you hear? The crackle of a fire? Purring of cats? The breath-like sound of the ocean? Birds singing or chirping?
  • What sensations can you feel? The heat of the sun? Coolness of a light breeze? Tight or relaxed muscles?
  • What do you taste? The salt of the ocean? Sweetness or bitterness on your tongue?
  • What do you feel internally? Are you hungry? Full? Do you feel happy, relaxed, or peaceful?

6.      If your attention wanders (and it will!) just notice it, and invite your attention back to the sensation of the breath at the tip of your nose. Then return to your peaceful place and begin again.

7.      Continue this meditation for 10 minutes or longer if you’d like.

No matter where you are, you take this safe place with you. Visit it any time you need to feel safe.

Tracy Weber, founder of Whole Life YogaToday’s meditation post is a gift from our guest, Tracy Weber founder of Whole Life Yoga, an award-winning yoga studio in Seattle, WA. She was certified through the American Viniyoga Institute’s yoga therapist training program, and she is registered at the highest level offered by Yoga Alliance (E-RYT 500).  In 2004, Tracy developed Whole Life Yoga’s yoga teacher training program. She has personally trained over 200 yoga teachers since then.Tracy originally came to yoga for relief from chronic back pain, and she rapidly discovered the balance and stress relief yoga provides. Tracy believes that the benefits of yoga are much broader than physical exercise, and that yoga can help people achieve what they want in all areas of life.

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3 thoughts on “Safe Place Meditation for Relaxation

  1. Hi Paul! No one place. I learned it first in my twenties when I was in counseling for anxiety. I’ve also practiced it at several meditation retreats and there are examples of similar meditations are all over the web. I suspect I also was re-introduced to it in a weekend workshop on visualization and healing, or perhaps a retreat I took with Joan Borysenko….The trick in this technique is to involve all senses–especially if you’re teaching it to others.

    Hope that helps!

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